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  • Kirsti Gwynn

Stop Procrastinating



You know when you have a goal you really want, and yet, when it comes to making it happen, you just… don’t?

I've been there a few times before.

It can leave you feeling like you’ve really let yourself down.

After all, spending time daydreaming about something, talking about it, and even planning it out, are all very different from taking action.

In today’s blog, I’m going to share with you the real reason behind self-sabotage, and what your procrastination actually means.

First, let’s bust a big myth around procrastination:

“If you really want something, you’ll make it happen.”

Heard that one before?

Hearing that used to make me feel really awful. If I was struggling to get myself to feel motivated enough to do whatever it is I wanted to do, it wasn’t very helpful to hear the assumption that I must not really want it.

I started to question whether I really cared that much about it after all. Then, I began to question myself.

“What’s wrong with me?” I’d wonder. “Maybe I don’t really want this… do I?”

This unleashed a wave of self-doubt and self-criticism.

The thing is, there always remained a part of me that knew I did want my goal.

But how confusing was that?! If I wanted it so badly, then why wasn’t I doing anything about it?

Here’s why...

I was afraid.

I was afraid of failing. I was afraid of being rejected. I was afraid of discovering that my vision for my future was more fantasy than reality, destined to remain in my head.

If you’re not taking action on a goal you know you want, it’s usually because of fear.

It’s fear that says: “But taking this risk means you could get rejected. Trying something new means you could fail. If it doesn’t work out, people will think badly of you…. And you don’t want that.”

It’s not that you don’t want the goal. Maybe it’s that you don’t want the potential failure, rejection and judgment, and all the other things that you inevitably risk when you move out of your comfort zone.

When it comes to procrastination, fear is often the culprit.

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